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­Mechanical art: Japanese scientists unveil robot calligrapher

Published time: October 03, 2012 14:45
Edited time: October 03, 2012 18:45
Japan's Keio University associate professor Seiichiro Katsura demonstrates a robot (R) that can mimic the exact brush strokes of master painters or calligraphers at Asia's largest electronics trade show, the Combined Exhibition of Advanced Technologies (CEATEC) exhibition at Chiba, suburban Tokyo.(AFP Photo / Jiji Press)

Japan's Keio University associate professor Seiichiro Katsura demonstrates a robot (R) that can mimic the exact brush strokes of master painters or calligraphers at Asia's largest electronics trade show, the Combined Exhibition of Advanced Technologies (CEATEC) exhibition at Chiba, suburban Tokyo.(AFP Photo / Jiji Press)

Japanese researchers have found way to preserve the centuries old tradition of calligraphy. They have created a robot that memorize artist’s brush strokes and recreates art and calligraphy.

The robot needs to be taught before it can create something. The artist starts drawing calligraphy while his brush is attached to the robot’s mechanical hand. It remembers each move the artist makes, the pressure on the brush and the angles and then just copies them, Agence France Presse reports.

“The device is endowed with a motor that moves as the person moves the brush. And then the moves are recorded digitally. Then the robot uses the same motor to produce the exact same moves,” Associate Professor Seichiro Katsura of Keio University explains.

The aim of the robot is to preserve the traditional Japanese calligraphy and can also be used to recreate other pieces of art.

“In Japan the population is aging rapidly and the birth rate is slowing down. The generation gap between younger and older people is getting bigger. And there is a risk that traditions such as calligraphy might not be transmitted to the younger generations,” Seichiro Katsura says. “We found that it’s possible to avoid this thanks to this robot.”

The robot was unveiled at Asia’s biggest tech fair CEATEC – the Combined Exhibition of Advanced Technologies which opened on Tuesday at Makuhari, near Tokyo.

Japan′s Keio University associate professor Seiichiro Katsura demonstrates a robot (R) that can mimic the exact brush strokes of master painters or calligraphers at Asia′s largest electronics trade show, the Combined Exhibition of Advanced Technologies (CEATEC) exhibition at Chiba, suburban Tokyo.(AFP Photo / Jiji Press)
Japan's Keio University associate professor Seiichiro Katsura demonstrates a robot (R) that can mimic the exact brush strokes of master painters or calligraphers at Asia's largest electronics trade show, the Combined Exhibition of Advanced Technologies (CEATEC) exhibition at Chiba, suburban Tokyo.(AFP Photo / Jiji Press)

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