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'Breaking the Taboo': US presidents admit drug policies were wrong in new documentary

Published time: December 02, 2012 12:30
Edited time: December 02, 2012 16:30

A screenshot from 'Breaking the Taboo' trailer; Youtube video courtesy of breakingthetaboofilm

Download video (13.87 MB)

A documentary film that features interviews with former US presidents, Jimmy Carter and Bill Clinton among them, admitting their drug-related policies in the war against drugs were wrong, is set to be released in America next week.

­The summary to the "Breaking the Taboo" project on the film's website informs that the war on drugs has been raging for 40 years. "Over a trillion dollars has been spent, millions of people imprisoned, and countless thousands killed. And for what? The illegal drug market is worth $330-400 billion per year, drugs are cheaper and more prevalent than ever before, and in a growing number of countries drug cartels are the major threat to national security. Yet our governments carry on regardless," production notes from the Sundog Pictures company, run by the son of Virgin Group boss Sir Richard Branson, state.

The documentary, narrated by Invictus star Morgan Freeman, follows the Global Commission On Drugs Policy in order "to break the political taboo, explore the controversial solutions and bravely demand a new agenda."

Ahead of its release on December 7, the Breaking the Taboo campaign has been in full swing on YouTube, supported by Sting, Yoko Ono and Noam Chomsky, among others.

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