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­US celebrities raise $23 million for Sandy victims

Published time: November 04, 2012 16:15
Edited time: November 04, 2012 22:22
Jon Bon Jovi performing at NBCUniversal and The American Red Cross benefit to help victims of Hurricane Sandy (AFP Photo / David Becker)

Jon Bon Jovi performing at NBCUniversal and The American Red Cross benefit to help victims of Hurricane Sandy (AFP Photo / David Becker)

Big named US celebrities have joined forces to help the victims of Superstorm Sandy. The benefit event raised almost $23 million, after the hurricane caused billions of dollars of damage and resulted in more than 100 deaths.

NBC Universal and the American Red Cross initiated the fundraiser. Music superstars including Steven Tyler, Bruce Springsteen, Billy Joel, Jon Bon Jovi, Mary J. Blige, Sting and Christina Aguilera joined the cause and performed at the charitable show broadcast on NBC.

Celebrities like Danny De Vito, Whoopi Goldberg, Jon Stewart, Jimmy Fallon, Kevin Bacon, also took part in the event to show their support.

"We are incredibly grateful and humbled by this outpouring of support for those who are suffering," the Red Cross' Chief Marketing Officer Peggy Dyer said in a statement. "Our preliminary results of nearly $23 million raised are an extraordinary example of how the American people pull together in times of disaster."

According to the organizers, donations will go “directly to those in need.” The Red Cross said the charitable telethon held Friday scooped most attention, as website and phone traffic exceeded the previous five years’ charity telethons’ figures.

“We urge the public to continue to give. We also thank the dedicated and talented team at NBC Universal for the millions of people they have helped through this telethon."

Superstorm Sandy has claimed the lives of over 100 people with the death toll continuing to rise. Damages are estimated at up to $20 billion in insured losses and $50 billion in economic losses, according to disaster monitoring company Eqecat.

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