Keep up with the news by installing RT’s extension for . Never miss a story with this clean and simple app that delivers the latest headlines to you.

 

Tough policing fails to deter New York’s 99%

Published time: October 17, 2011 05:51
Edited time: October 18, 2011 02:14

Riot police break an Occupy Wall Street protest on Times Square in New York, October 15, 2011 (AFP Photo / Emmanuel Dunand)

Download video (27.56 MB)

The anti-Wall Street campaign that inspired global protests at the weekend is into its fifth week with more demonstrations planned. Despite a hardline police response, US activists say they will stay for as long as it takes to end economic injustice.

­An unprecedented number of people marched to Times Square where they converged in solidarity with other Occupy actions taking place around the world. Once at their destination, protesters held a rally for several hours and pitched tents in the area.

The march itself was peaceful. However once it arrived at Times Square, a contingent of protesters were trapped by police barricades and held for several hours, unable to move to the right or left, or get out. Police forced the crowds back, nearly trampling some protesters, while police scooters ran over several people. A total of 92 arrests were made in the course of the OWS actions in New York over the weekend.

"Banks got bailed out, we got sold out!" they chanted from within police barricades.

A number of protesters sitting peacefully or turning out to speak on what they see as  economic injustice were taken by the police, slammed violently onto the ground, made to put their hands up, and driven away.

RT’s Lucy Kafanov reports that at one point, as the RT crew was trying to film the scenes, explaining that they were press covering the events, they were pushed back by police officers who blinded their cameras with strobe lights – a move which Kafanov said was unprecedented.   

Meanwhile, the rallies caused traffic chaos around Lower Manhattan as protesters filled the streets carrying placards reading “We are the 99 per cent” – a reference to the 99 per cent of ordinary people who struggle to make ends meet while the world’s richest one per cent control billions of dollars in assets.

­Watch RT's GayaneChichakyan's report from New York


Comments

Add comment

Authorization required for adding comments

Register or

Name

Password

Show password

Register

or Register

Request a new password

Send

or Register

To complete a registration check
your Email:

OK

or Register

A password has been sent to your email address

Edit profile

X

Name

New password

Retype new password

Current password

Save

Cancel

Follow us

Follow us