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​Perestroika in reverse? High-profile purge hints at N. Korea reform rift

10.12.2013 08:26

The public sacking of Kim Jong-un’s uncle and mentor is not a sign of regime instability; it demonstrates that the young leader is firmly in control and is able to consolidate his power by purging any possible rival figures without question.

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Comments (6) Sort by: Highest rating Oldest first Newest first

 

KK Singh 13.12.2013 04:30

“North Korea is much better off now than, perhaps, any moment of its post-1945 history.”
And
North Korea isn’t going anywhere; collapse is not imminent, opponents have been warned and the regime is strong.
Wish N Koreans all the best!

 

rogirl 11.12.2013 04:53

The Uncle in law had strong views opposite to that of his wife's nephew, Kim-Jong-un that were unreconcilable so the least powerful one (uncle) was been eased out, this sort of thing happens in families every day all over rhe world.

 

Pat Richards 10.12.2013 14:41

They should be able to live this way if they want it. Nobody can tell them differently. There is no luxury and exgaration but there is also no social unequality and stealing from one class of people for the sake of others and that is comendable. Perestroika in reverse is adequate name for the article. If somebody put traitor Gorbatchov in place during 1980s today there would be different view on the social states and they would be model for western world to look at. Too bad nobody had the balls to do it and especially with that drunk Yeltsin.

 

Pat Richards 10.12.2013 14:35

Regula 10.12.2013 12:31

Kim Jong un may regret that move if the economy is increasing - that would still have been the outcome of the policies of the now disgraced uncle. If North Korea wants to progress, at some point it will have to open up a bit and most certainly, it will have to modernize its agriculture, where China could have helped, assuming he lets China help.

  


His uncle was probably old far-t who liked lavish lifestyle and made for it unneccesary expenditures. It is a bit unussual country for the rest of the world when it looks toward it but these are such people.

 

Regula 10.12.2013 12:31

Kim Jong un may regret that move if the economy is increasing - that would still have been the outcome of the policies of the now disgraced uncle. If North Korea wants to progress, at some point it will have to open up a bit and most certainly, it will have to modernize its agriculture, where China could have helped, assuming he lets China help.

 

Proud Atheist 10.12.2013 10:27

What a weird country!!

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