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Breivik verdict: LIVE UPDATES

Published time: August 24, 2012 07:16
Edited time: August 24, 2012 20:03
Mass murderer Anders Behring Breivik arrives at the court room in Oslo Courthouse on August 24, 2012. (AFP Photo/Heiko Junge)

Mass murderer Anders Behring Breivik arrives at the court room in Oslo Courthouse on August 24, 2012. (AFP Photo/Heiko Junge)

16:55 GMT: The Norwegian director of public prosecutions confirmed the prosecution would not appeal the Breivik's verdict. With both parties having forgone the right to appeal, the verdict is for all intents and purposes legally binding despite the 14 day deadline to file.

­16:32 GMT: Court is adjourned. Before being taken out of court, he salutes with his right fist. He will now be taken back to prison.

16:31 GMT: Breivik confirms he will not appeal the verdict. Prosecutors have 14 days to consider filing an appeal.

­16: 29 GMT: Breivik says he cannot accept the sentence because it is “illegitimate.” He says however, that by appealing the verdict, he would “legitimize"the system. He attempted to apologize to militant nationalists for not killing more before being cut off by the judge.

­16:27 GMT: Breivik speaks out. "I do not recognise this court because you receive your mandate from political parties that accept multiculturalism."

­16:26 GMT:"Sitting just 1.5 metre from #Breivik noticing how pale he is compared to his lawyers. He has obviously not seen the sun for a long time," Trygve Sorvaag ‏wrote via twitter.

"People clarly tired here inside courtroom 250. Air is warm and stuffy after 7.5 hours reading of verdict. #Breivik trial ending soon," he continued.

16: 25 GMT: The judge describes how Breivik killed 77 people, most of them youths whom he shot at point blank range. The victims who survived the massacre have suffered considerable physical and mental injuries, while the next of kin of those who died are suffering from bereavement and grief. Breivik took a sip of water while this was being read out.

16:15 GMT: In reference to sentencing the defendant to 21 years in prison, the judge mentions how there must be imminent risk that the perpetrator will reoffend if he remains free. She said“violence” and “murder” are “evidently stimulating” for the defendant.

­16:07 GMT: Following the lengthy review of his psychological wellbeing, Breivik was described as “a special case” who does not fulfill the criteria for paranoid psychosis.

­16:03 GMT:“I find that he is in good mental shape, I find his deviating comments a sign of his extreme ideology…not psychotic personality" the psychological assessor said in reference to what had preiviously been described as potentially "psychotic symptoms."

­16:00 GMT:  A psychology specialist who had 20 talks with Breivik in total – half of which were one-on-one – said Breivik displayed “strong paranoid and conspiratorial ideas.” The psychologist also described Breivik as having a “narcissistic personality” and “delusions of grandeur”.

­15:52 GMT: The defendant is capable of seeing how others can deem his views extreme. While an individual of “questionable sanity” might attempt to violently defend his delusions or go silent upon being challenged, Brevik was able to show “flexibility.”

­15:47 GMT: Court is back in session. While incarcerated, the defendant has had regular contact with healthcare professionals. His contact with mental health professionals prior to the killing spree remains doubtful, though he had reportedly spoken to a doctor about sleeping problems.

­15:43 GMT:"It is easier to accept an outcome in which the perpetrator will have to serve a sentence and not just undergo medical treatment. We should not treat terrorists as though they were minors," the Norwegian daily Dagbladet commented on the verdict.

­15:40 GMT: "Norwegian commentators describing this day – 24 August as a 'devastating day for forensic psychiatry. Minister of justice announced revamp,'" Trygve Sorvaag wrote via Twitter.

­15:30 GMT: Court breaks for recess.

15:15 GMT: Experts said he did not exhibit psychotic symptoms, and his increased sense of power and self-wroth might have been indicative of something else.

The defendant is described as having to ability to adapt his answers to the questions being posed, which could be symptomatic of pathological lying.

­15:10 GMT: “The subject’s” mother described him as being“very worried about information, his own looks…increasingly more into politics and history.” She said he had trouble gauging “how much distance he should keep from her,” a potential consequence of paranoid delusion. His mother was interviewed more than 200 times. In early statements she had described him as being normal, but later contradicted herself by characterizing him as being "beyond."

Other family members had failed to notice any abnormal behavior from 2010.

­15:03 GMT: The defendant had stamina, control of his impulses and an ability to function. His ability to plan extensively is not conducive of someone who is mentally impaired.

Following his hiatus, he returned to some of his former activities, repaid his mother, began dressing well, joined a masonic lodge, and traveled with his some friends to Budapest in 2009.

­14:58 GMT: The defendant underwent a professional, practical and social change in conduct in line with his preparations to carry out a terrorist act.

Breivik smiles once the judge mentions his decision to move back in with his mother, the role World of Warcraft played in his life, and his decision to further withdraw from his professional and social activities.

­14:55 GMT: The defendant appeared more blunted in court than in his holding cell, where he seems to be more at ease. Breivik “appears as emotionally flattened when it comes to realizing the suffering he’s caused others,” the judge continued.

­14:52: The judge further mentions how Breivik exhibited “serious empathetic failure” as he recounted events from his childhood without emotion. Then, he went on to cry during the presentation of his own propaganda film in court because he was “touched.”

­14:48 GMT: The judge is describing at length how Breivik’s use of neologisms – what psychiatrists would describe as words which only carry meaning for the individual using them – could still be contextually understood by others, and were thus not equivalent to incoherent babbling.

­14:45 GMT: Court is back in session.

­14:21 GMT: Brevik is being handcuffed. The court breaks for recess.

­14:18 GMT: A self-perceived responsibility to decide who was to live and who was to die was"completely irresponsible from an ethical point of view,” the judge said. It was difficult for the court to see how terrorist acts and murder can have a bearing on a political cause. They need to determine if he was psychotically deluded.

­14:15 GMT: The verdict is getting a mixed reaction on Twitter, with some happy that Breivik has been found sane and sentenced to prison, while others are indignant that the sentence isn’t harsh enough.

"I'm disgusted that Breivik has got less than 3 1/2 months for each person that he murdered! Outrageous!" - Steve Barnes

"Can someone tell my HOW, 3 months for every Breivik victim is justice? You get more for theft over here." – Paul Fabretti

­14:05 GMT: Breivik grins smugly as the evidence from the report on his mental health is read out, including the idea that he would one day become King of Norway.

­14:00 GMT: The judge says that while the defendant is sane, he has “bizarre grandiose delusions” that he is a crusader, belongs to the Knights Templar, is a pioneer in a European civil war, and is a rightful heir to the Norwegian throne.

­13:58 GMT: In February, a district court ruled that Breivik undergo a compulsory psychiatric examination for a period of 4 weeks. The examination was concluded on April 10, finding that Breivik was not psychotic, but did suffer from dissociative narcissistic personality disorder.

13:55 GMT: Four psychiatrists were appointed to determine Breivik’s sanity. Based on a report finished on 29 November, it was found that Breivik was psychotic at the time he committed the criminal act.

­13:50 GMT: The judge says that despite the defendant’s wish to be declared sane, the court does not want its ruling to be subjective. What if the accused were to change his mind?

­13:40 GMT: In defining psychosis, the judge differentiates between being psychotic in a diagnostic versus a legal sense. “The possibility of mental disease at the time of the act is not sufficient for the defendant to be considered criminally insane," the judge said. If there is reasonable doubt as to the offender’s criminal sanity, he must be acquitted, she continued.

13:33 GMT: Court is now back in session. After Breivik’s handcuffs were removed, one of the judges began reading from section six on criminal insanity as they define the criteria for what constitutes a mentally ill person or one suffering from psychosis.

13:14 GMT: Breivik said the motive behind the bomb attack was to strike at the government administration. Additionally, the intention of the terrorist attack was "no doubt" to incite serious fear among the Norwegian population, said the judge.

­12:50 GMT: Breivik’s lawyer Vibeke Hein Baera said earlier that “this is an important day for me personally.”

“I think my thoughts are mostly with those who are so deeply touched, those who have lost their loved ones, and have had a year that has been very difficult for them and I think today is important for them to see if they can, this is the final day to move on with their lives," said Baera.

12:41 GMT: The judges will shortly present the evidence that led them to rule Breivik was sound of mind when he committed the murders.

12:13 GMT: The judge is now describing the physical and psychological harm suffered by the Utoya massacre survivors, detailing their attempts to escape from Breivik’s gunfire.

12:05 GMT: The court is back in session after the forty minute recess.

Reuters/Stoyan Nenov
Reuters/Stoyan Nenov

12:02 GMT:"He says he won't appeal now that he has been found sane," Breivik's lawyer Geir Lippestad has told journalists.

12:00 GMT: The survivors of the attacks and relations of the victims were satisfied with the court's ruling.

“I am very relieved and happy about the outcome,'' Tore Sinding Bekkedal, who survived the Utoya shooting told AP. ”He is a pathetic and sad little person,'' Bekkedal added.

­11:50 GMT: The prosecutors have not yet decided whether or not they will appeal the verdict, tweeted Sky News correspondent, Trygve Sorvaag. They must make a decision to appeal within 14 days.

11:22 GMT: The court has adjourned for a break of 40 minutes. Breivik has been handcuffed and led out of the courtroom.

­11:18 GMT: People in the courtroom were reduced to tears by the graphic descriptions of how Breivik’s victims were shot.

11:17 GMT: Breivik could be seen frantically scribbling things down and looking nervous as the judges listed the murders he committed on Utoya Island.

11:05 GMT: ­The head of the Moscow Helsinki Group, Lyudmila Alekseyeva says that 21 years is not nearly enough for the Norwegian murderer.

"In Russia, he would have received life in prison. Such people deserve life in prison," Alekseyeva told Russian news agency Interfax. She added that she hoped Breivik’s jail term would be extended.

10:46 GMT: The judge is now examining each of the murders committed by Breivik on Utoya Island.

­10:44 GMT: Breivik appeared unfazed by the judge’s gruesome descriptions of the carnage caused by his attacks. In a previous court appearance he accepted that he committed a barbaric act but maintained he did it to avert a “greater barbarism.”

­10:38 GMT: One of the victims of the bomb blast was in a coma for a long period of time and has been progressively losing her vision. She suffers from post-traumatic amnesia and cannot remember the names of her own parents.

­10:28 GMT: The judge is now giving a detailed description of the injuries sustained by those caught in the bomb attack on Oslo’s government quarter.

­10:23 GMT: Many of those affected by the massacre have since struggled with mental problems, such as anxiety, a sense of insecurity and sleeping difficulties.

10:19 GMT: The judges have returned to the courtroom and the hearing has resumed.

10:17 GMT: Breivik has returned to the courtroom following the break.

Image from Twitter/@P_Deshayes
Image from Twitter/@P_Deshayes

10:01 GMT: The court has adjourned for a fifteen minute recess.

09:53 GMT: Breivik employed meditation techniques that were supposedly used by Japanese warriors to desensitize his emotions in preparation for the attacks.

­09:46 GMT: After taking blood and hair samples from Breivik, authorities ascertained he was under the influence of a stimulant during the attacks and "the possibility that it may have exaggerated any mania or hypermania cannot be completely ruled out."

­09:42GMT: Breivik previously stated that he will use his time in prison to build networks with others who share his views, as well as writing three books, detailing the ideology behind the attacks.

­09:36 GMT: Breivik was determined that an “armed revolution” was the only way to curtail Norway’s multiculturalism.

09:27 GMT: The judge has discussed Breivik’s withdrawal period from society when he obsessively played online game World of Warcraft. His character’s name in the game was “conservatism.”

Judges Wenche Arntzen (R) and Arne Lyng sit in Oslo Court as they pass judgment on Anders Behring Breivik in Oslo on August 24, 2012. (AFP Photo/Heiko Junge)
Judges Wenche Arntzen (R) and Arne Lyng sit in Oslo Court as they pass judgment on Anders Behring Breivik in Oslo on August 24, 2012. (AFP Photo/Heiko Junge)

09:22 GMT: Breivik’s 21-year sentence may be extended by five years at a time if he is still deemed a danger to society after the initial period has been served.

09:20 GMT: Breivik’s defense lawyers have said the convicted murderer will not launch an appeal if sentenced to prison.

­09:11 GMT: Breivik has been sentenced to “preventive detention” of a minimum of 10 years and a maximum of 21. After the original sentence has been served the court will reconsider whether he is still a danger to society at regular intervals.

“Anders Behring Breivik, born 13th February 1979, is sentenced… for a term of 21 years and a minimum period of 10 years, see the penal code section 39E first and second subsections. From the set term and the set minimum period a deduction of 445 days shall be made for time spent in custody."

AFP Photo/Cornelius Poppe
AFP Photo/Cornelius Poppe

­09:07 GMT: The judge has ruled that Anders Breivik was sane when he committed the murder of 77 people in Norway in July 2011.

09:02 GMT: An officer has taken off Breivik’s handcuffs and the court is now in session.

08:59 GMT: Anders Breivik has arrived in the courtroom and is chatting with his defense lawyer. Upon entering courtroom 250 the defendant flashed his trademark clenched-fist salute.

Self confessed mass murderer Anders Behring Breivik raises his fist in a right wing salute on arrival court room 250 at Oslo central court on August 24, 2012 (AFP Photo/Heiko Junge)
Self confessed mass murderer Anders Behring Breivik raises his fist in a right wing salute on arrival court room 250 at Oslo central court on August 24, 2012 (AFP Photo/Heiko Junge)
Image from Twitter/@P_Deshayes
Image from Twitter/@P_Deshayes

08:56 GMT: Judges Wenche Arntzen and Arne Lyng have entered the courtroom.

­08:53 GMT: Noted Norwegian academic Thomas Hyland Eriksen said although Breivik’s massacre united Norway against racial hatred, the population’s stance on multiculturalism is far from clear.

"There are schools where upwards of 90 per cent of the children have an immigrant background. And many people, and not just ethnic Norwegians, immigrants as well, feel that it's too much," Professor Eriksen told AP.

­08:48 GMT: Breivik’s lawyers said on Thursday that mass killer will not appeal if he is sentenced to prison. “What he says is if the judges find him not sane and mentally disturbed, he will appeal. If the judges sentence him to punishment and mentally sane, he says today, as we understand it, that he will not appeal."

08:46 GMT: Hundreds of journalists have gathered outside Oslo District Court and there are still long queues to get in.

Image from Twitter/@philipoconnor
Image from Twitter/@philipoconnor

­08:41 GMT: The courtroom is full with 15 minutes before proceedings begin.

08:39 GMT: Journalists on the scene confirm that Breivik has arrived at the court.

08:36 GMT: People have already begun filing into the courtroom 250 in anticipation of Breivik’s verdict.

08:28 GMT: 54 percent of Norwegians think that Breivik’s prison conditions are too good for him and 2 out of 3 believe he should have no PC access, tweeted a BBC journalist.

An undated handout picture distributed by Ila Prison shows one of the cells inside Ila prison, just outside Oslo, where Anders Behring Breivik has been held most of the time since the July 22 attacks in Oslo and at Utoeya last year. (AFP Photo/SCANPIX-Photo by Ila Prison/Glefs AS/NTB scanpix)
An undated handout picture distributed by Ila Prison shows one of the cells inside Ila prison, just outside Oslo, where Anders Behring Breivik has been held most of the time since the July 22 attacks in Oslo and at Utoeya last year. (AFP Photo/SCANPIX-Photo by Ila Prison/Glefs AS/NTB scanpix)
AFP Photo/SCANPIX-Photo by Ila Prison/Glefs AS/NTB scanpix
AFP Photo/SCANPIX-Photo by Ila Prison/Glefs AS/NTB scanpix

08:22 GMT: Anders Breivik has left Ila Prison outside the Norwegian capital and is heading to Oslo district court to be sentenced.

Mass murderer Anders Behring Breivik leaves Ila prison for Oslo Courthouse where Oslo Court will pass the judgement against him. (AFP Photo)
Mass murderer Anders Behring Breivik leaves Ila prison for Oslo Courthouse where Oslo Court will pass the judgement against him. (AFP Photo)

08:20 GMT: Anders Behring Breivik, the Norwegian accused of terrorism and mass murder awaits the final court ruling in Oslo on Friday. Breivik has resolved not to appeal the verdict if he is found to be sane and sent to prison, but will contest any ruling that declares him insane.

The defendant has admitted to murdering 69 people in a shooting spree at a Labor youth camp on Utoya Island and another eight in an Oslo bombing on July 22.

If the court rules that Breivik is of sound mind he faces a 21-year jail sentence, which may be extended if he is still considered a threat to society. If the defendant is declared insane he will dispatched to a secure psychiatric unit.

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