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95.7% of Crimeans in referendum voted to join Russia - preliminary results

Published time: March 16, 2014 18:07
Edited time: March 17, 2014 04:16

People celebrate as they wait for the announcement of preliminary results of today's referendum on Lenin Square in the Crimean capital of Simferopol March 16, 2014 (Reuters / Thomas Peter)

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Over 95 percent of voters in the Crimean referendum have answered ‘yes’ to the autonomous republic joining Russia and less than 4 percent of the vote participants want the region to remain part of Ukraine, according to preliminary results.

With over 75 percent of the votes already counted, preliminary result show that 95.7 percent of voters said 'yes' to the reunion of the republic with Russia as a constituent unit of the Russian Federation. Only 3.2 percent of the ballots were cast for staying with Ukraine as an Autonomous Republic with broader rights. The remaining 1.1 percent of the ballots were declared invalid.

The overall voter turnout in the referendum on the status of Crimea is 81,37%, according to the head of the Crimean parliament’s commission on the referendum, Mikhail Malyshev.

The preliminary results of the popular vote were announced during a meeting in the center of Sevastopol, the city that hosts Russia's Black Sea fleet. The final results will be announced at a press conference at 7:00 GMT on Monday.

Over a half of the Tatars living in the port city took part in the referendum, with the majority of them voting in favor of joining Russia, reports Itar-Tass citing a representative of the Tatar community Lenur Usmanov. About 40% of Crimean Tatars went to polling stations on Sunday, the republic’s prime minister Sergey Aksyonov said.

In Simferopol, the capital of the republic, at least 15,000 have gathered to celebrate the referendum in central Lenin square and people reportedly keep arriving. Demonstrators, waving Russian and Crimean flags, were watching a live concert while waiting for the announcement of preliminary results of the voting.

People wrapped with Russian flags watch fireworks during celebrations after the preliminary results of today's referendum are announced on Lenin Square in the Crimean capital of Simferopol March 16, 2014 (Reuters / Thomas Peter)

Russian President Vladimir Putin said that the citizens of the peninsula have been given an opportunity to freely express their will and exercise their right to self-determination.

International observers are planning to present their final declaration on the Crimean referendum on March 17, the head of the monitors’ commission, Polish MP Mateusz Piskorski told journalists. He added that the voting was held in line with international norms and standards. People in Crimea are gripped by the feeling that their dreams have come true – a desire to join Russia, which they believe can guarantee the stabilization in their social and political life, Piskorski told RT.

Next week, Crimea will officially introduce the ruble as a second official currency along with Ukrainian hryvna, Aksyonov told Interfax. In his words, the dual currency will be in place for about six months.

Overall, the republic’s integration into Russia will take up to a year, the Prime Minister said, adding that it could be done faster. However, they want to maintain relations with “economic entities, including Ukraine,” rather than burn bridges.

Moscow is closely monitoring the vote count in Crimea, said Russia’s Deputy Foreign Minister Georgy Karasin.

The results of the referendum will be considered once they are drawn up,” he told Itar-Tass.

The decision to hold a referendum was made after the bloody uprising in Kiev which ousted President Vladimir Yanukovich from power. Crimea - which is home to an ethnic Russian majority population - refused to recognize the coup-appointed government as legitimate. Crimeans feared that the new leadership would not represent their interests and respect rights. Crimeans were particularly unhappy over parliament's decision to revoke the law allowing using minority languages – including Russian – as official along with the Ukrainian tongue. Crimeans staged mass anti-Maidan protests and asked Russia to protect them.

People wave Russian flag as they celebrate the announcement of preliminary results of today's referendum at Lenin Square in the Crimean capital of Simferopol March 16, 2014 (Reuters / Vasily Fedosenko)

People sing the Russian national anthem as they celebrate in Simferopol's Lenin Square on March 16, 2014 after exit polls showed that about 95.5 percent of voters in Ukraine's Crimea region supported union with Russia (AFP Photo / Dimitar Dilkoff)

Crimean Prime Minister Sergey Aksyonov (C) stands on a stage as preliminary results of today's referendum are announced on Lenin Square in the Crimean capital of Simferopol March 16, 2014 (Reuters / Thomas Peter)

Comments (772)

 

Winston 18.03.2014 11:34

This would have passed by a relatively large margin no matter what, but come on 95%. I doubt you could get more than 90% of any random selection of people to agree they need oxygen to live. Did they hire North Korea's vote counters?

 

Ian Beddowes 17.03.2014 21:37

How can normal people agree to be governed by a small group of foreign-backed Nazi lunatics from the other side of the country that seized power by force. Let Donetsk follow Crimea and eventually the whole of the Ukraine.

 

ishmael oliveras 17.03.2014 14:47

Ya I'm going to say this only American can over throw it's own government by law the oldest of laws but where never going to be able to it feels like they where wanting this and if a nation as a people want to be a part of Russia then let it

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