Keep up with the news by installing RT’s extension for . Never miss a story with this clean and simple app that delivers the latest headlines to you.

 

Oregon man lives inside retired Boeing 727 jet (PHOTOS, VIDEO)

Published time: June 09, 2014 17:41
Edited time: June 10, 2014 14:23
Bruce Campbell stands near his Boeing 727 home in the woods outside the suburbs of Portland, Oregon May 21, 2014. (Reuters/Steve Dipaola)

Bruce Campbell stands near his Boeing 727 home in the woods outside the suburbs of Portland, Oregon May 21, 2014. (Reuters/Steve Dipaola)

A former electrical engineer from Portland, Oregon maintains a residence six months out of the year inside of a home that is far from plain — yet all too “plane” at the same time.

Bruce Campbell, 64, has been living in a Boeing 727 jet since 1999, when he acquired the aircraft and dumped it on a 10-acre lot of land he owned in the Pacific Northwest city.

During the last 15 years, Campbell has spent around $218,000 restoring the aircraft to make it into a rather unusual residence, to say the least: in addition to the cockpit and landing gears, the jet now contains a makeshift sleeping space and a kitchen area complete with microwave and toaster.

Half of the year, Campbell lives in the jet and sleeps on a futon situated only a few feet away from the cockpit door.

“The cabin and cockpit combination provide 1,066 square feet of exhilarating aerospace quality,” he writes on his website.

The Boeing 727 home of Bruce Campbell is seen in the woods outside the suburbs of Portland, Oregon May 21, 2014. (Reuters/Steve Dipaola)

Campbell isn’t exaggerating, though. On his homepage, he explains why he opted to make his home in an aircraft instead of a more traditional structure.

“I don't mean to offend, but wood is in my view a terrible building material. It biodegrades - it's termite chow. And microbe (rot) chow. Or it's firewood. It just depends upon which happens first. It's a relatively weak material, and it's secured with low tech fasteners using low tech techniques. And traditional rectangular designs are inferior structurally - they unreasonably sacrifice strength for boxy ergonomics,” he says.

Bruce Campbell leans on a tyre of his Boeing 727 home in the woods outside the suburbs of Portland, Oregon May 21, 2014. (Reuters/Steve Dipaola)

“But retired airliners,” on the other hand, “are profoundly well designed, high tech, aerospace quality sealed pressure canisters that can withstand 575 mph winds and seven G acceleration forces with ease.”

They “could last for centuries,” Campbell says, are highly fire resistant and provide superior security.

Bruce Campbell sits in the cockpit of his Boeing 727 home in the woods outside the suburbs of Portland, Oregon May 21, 2014. (Reuters/Steve Dipaola)

“They're among the finest structures that mankind has ever built,” he says, and it’s a shame that they’re usually just turned into scrap.

“To me it makes no sense at all to destroy the finest structures available and then turn around and build homes out of materials which are fundamentally little better than pressed cardboard, using ancient and inferior design and building methods."

Bruce Campbell sits on his futon bed while using a laptop in his Boeing 727 home in the woods outside the suburbs of Portland, Oregon May 21, 2014. (Reuters/Steve Dipaola)

Not to mention, of course, the sheer novelty. “It's a great toy. Trick doors, trick floors. Hatches here, latches there, clever gadgets everywhere. Cool interior lights, awesome exterior lights, sleek gleaming appearance, titanium ducts, Star Trek movies [in[ a Star Trek like setting,” he writes. “It's a constant exploratory adventure, ever entertaining, providing fundamental sustenance for a[n] old technology nerd like me. Having lots of little toys is very fulfilling. Having lots of little toys enclosed in a very big toy is nirvana.”

Speaking to Reuters recently, Campbell said continuing this long-running project is a personal goal of his. “Mine is to change humanity’s behavior in this little niche,” he told the newswire.

Bruce Campbell brushes his teeth at a sink in his Boeing 727 home in the woods outside the suburbs of Portland, Oregon May 21, 2014. (Reuters/Steve Dipaola)

Campbell could soon have some company, though. Reuters reported that 1,200 to 1,800 aircraft will be dismantled around the world over the next three years, opening up the possibility for others to follow in his footsteps.

"AFRA is happy to see aircraft fuselages re-purposed in a range of creative ways," Martin Todd,a spokesman for the Aircraft Fleet Recycling Association, told Reuters. "We would want them to be recovered and be re-used in an environmentally sustainable fashion."

Bruce Campbell shaves in his Boeing 727 home in the woods outside the suburbs of Portland, Oregon May 21, 2014. (Reuters/Steve Dipaola)

The AFRA was unable to provide Reuters with statistics pertaining to how many others have turned airliners into homes like Campbell has been doing for a decade-and-a-half, but the former engineer might soon be ready to try another endeavor on his own: according to Reuters, he has expressed plans in modifying an even larger jet, a Boeing 747, and turning it into a home in Japan.

Bruce Campbell poses at the tail entry of his Boeing 727 home in the woods outside the suburbs of Portland, Oregon May 21, 2014. (Reuters/Steve Dipaola)

Comments (23)

 

Zeph Orac 23.06.2014 03:38

Guess no one in miles has heard of Buckminster Fuller. This idea has already been tried with his Dymaxion House. No one wanted to live in them. The human body is a living thing, not a machine. Being surrounded by decaying plastics, asbestos, and goodness what other toxins are buried in an airplane, just taking an 8 hour flight in one is a shock to the system. We build with wood, stone and mortar (or should go back to it) because it keeps us healthy, well and wise.

 

stibbs11 18.06.2014 13:07

Interesting idea, doubt this would go over well in NewYork or similar.
Gotta love the idea of moving away from typical materials, most feel insulation is a big factor in wood homes, there are metal frames too but as pointed out there are problems.

Best of luck changing the world.

 

Shawn Anderson 10.06.2014 15:26

Funny that he speaks of wood in the beginning the way he does but looks like wood stacked under the fuselage to level it. Could be wrong though.

View all comments (23)
Add comment

Authorization required for adding comments

Register or

Name

Password

Show password

Register

or Register

Request a new password

Send

or Register

To complete a registration check
your Email:

OK

or Register

A password has been sent to your email address

Edit profile

X

Name

New password

Retype new password

Current password

Save

Cancel

Follow us

Follow us