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New Mexico nuclear plant workers exposed to radiation

Published time: February 27, 2014 16:46
Reuters / Christian Charisius

Reuters / Christian Charisius

Positive results for radiation exposure were found in 13 workers following a leak at the United States’ first underground nuclear waste repository near Carlsbad, New Mexico, an Associated Press report stated.

Officials said that all employees were checked for external contamination before they left the Waste Isolation Pilot Project (WIPP) facility the day the leak occurred, but that biological samples were also taken to test for the possibility that they were breathing in radioactive particles.

The US Department of Energy and the Nuclear Waste Partnership, which manages the plant’s daily operations, are expected to hold a press conference on Thursday to discuss the test results.

"It is important to note that these are initial sample results," the DOE and Nuclear Waste Partnership said in a joint statement. "These employees, both federal and contractor, will be asked to provide additional samples in order to fully determine the extent of any exposure."

According to CNN, Nuclear Waste Partnership (NWP) spokesman Donavan Mager said the number of people exposed to radiation could not be confirmed due to the privacy rule under the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act. He did say the test results suggest exposure to the synthetic, radioactive metal americium.

The preliminary test results come just days after more airborne radiation was detected in the area surrounding the plant. Earlier this month, WIPP officials noticed a sharp rise in radiation levels, which they connected to a leak inside one of its underground tunnels. The plant is one of three deep nuclear repositories around the globe, storing nuclear waste 600 meters below the earth’s surface.

Since the WIPP’s creation in 1999, this is the first time it has been known to release any radioactive material. Officials told the AP that it may take weeks to learn what caused the leak. Even before this incident, a salt truck caught fire in a separate part of the facility, but that is believed to be unrelated.

Despite the record levels of radiation detected around the area, the DOE stated the readings fall “well below” the standards outlined by the Environmental Protection Agency, and that they do not pose a public or environmental threat.

On Monday, the DOE’s Joe Franco and the NWP’s Farok Sharif held a community meeting to ease public fear over the situation. In response to a question from a local resident, Franco said, "there is no risk from this event that would be a hazard to you or your children."

Regardless, the AP noted that Senator Tom Udall (D-N.M.) will ask the EPA to send portable air monitors to Carlsbad as a precaution.

"The health and safety of the Carlsbad community and WIPP personnel are my top priority," he said.

Comments (7)

 

Ksaint3244 18.03.2014 19:17

Researchers beleive that now that Pandas can use Ak-47 they will soon rise to take over the planet and with adaptation to the environment they will become immune to radiation....

 

Gary Kutcher 28.02.2014 15:24

No Nukes is Good Nukes! Stop poisoning our planet!!

 

Alexander Frye 28.02.2014 08:24

So, I'm exposed to radiation everyday that I live... How many Sieverts, Curies, or RADs are we talking about here? What's the boogey man media trying to do now?

View all comments (7)
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